They’re Calling It A Cure For Aging. But Didn’t Caltech/UCLA Researchers Just Repeat An Experiment That Had Already Been Demonstrated?

Research by scientists at Caltech and UCLA claim they have uncovered ways to slow and reverse the aging process by invigorating the mitochondrial “batteries” in living cells which facilitates repair of broken DNA.

Continue reading They’re Calling It A Cure For Aging. But Didn’t Caltech/UCLA Researchers Just Repeat An Experiment That Had Already Been Demonstrated?

Some nonagerians (90-99 years old) maintain superior memory despite brain plaque

Brain plaque known as beta amyloid in the hippocampus of the human brain is considered a hallmark sign of Alzheimer’s disease memory loss.  Medical efforts to reduce brain plaque abound.  But researchers at Northwestern University report they tested individuals in their ninth decade of life whose memory was intact till their death.  [Science Daily Nov 16, 2016]

Continue reading Some nonagerians (90-99 years old) maintain superior memory despite brain plaque

Large decrease in coronary heart disease reported

The large decrease in coronary heart disease, about 20%, reported in the US between the years 1983-2011 goes unexplained, though it is incorrectly attributed to statin drugs, other modern medicines and surgical treatments. Over the same period of time, diabetes increased dramatically. [Science Daily Nov 13, 2016; [Journal American Medical Association Nov 15, 2016]

Continue reading Large decrease in coronary heart disease reported

$100,000-a-year cancer drugs have little effect on life expectancy

As pharmaceutical companies plunder pools of insurance funds in the futile treatment of cancer, pressure has come to bear to fast-track approval of drugs that marginally improve survival.  A major review of new cancer drugs between 2002 and 2014 shows 48 treatments extended life by an average of just two months.

Continue reading $100,000-a-year cancer drugs have little effect on life expectancy

Walgreen’s sues blood-testing company for $140 million

The most recent billionaire to fall from grace, Elizabeth Holmes, fooled Stanford University, Walgreen’s drug chain and a major investment firm by falsely claiming her company, Theranos, had a machine that could perform 23 blood analyses from a single drop of blood.  Theranos is now facing a $140 million lawsuit for damages from Walgreen’s for breach of contract.  Walgreen’s was ready to install the machines in their stores when the bottom fell out of Theranos when its technology was revealed to be useless.  [Wall Street Journal Nov 8, 2016] It couldn’t have happened to a nicer billionaire, even if her paper wealth was short lived.